Silestone VS Granite Countertops

by Peter Liang

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A quick note before we start the comparison. The end of this article touches briefly on the price of Silestone countertops. If you’re looking for a real world example of getting accurate price quotes for Silestone countertops you’ll find this page more useful.
Silestone vs Granite Granite countertops are made of 100% natural stone and are polished in order to give it a lusterous appearance. It has the durability and resistance of natural stone and it can provide an amazing range of colors and patterns as each piece is unique.

However, the granite is made of crystalline material, which allows small spaces and fissures. Even though it has a very high level of resilience, it is more susceptible to chipping or cracking if handled with excessive force. Moreover, the occasional porous surface can make granite absorbent, which can cause staining and provides a better environment for bacteria growth. In order to avoid this, it is recommended to seal granite countertops regularly.

Related: Learn more about the benefits of Silestone.

When choosing to remodel your kitchen or your bathroom, it generally comes down to a silestone vs granite competition, as they are the top contenders for modern and durable countertops.

What Is Silestone?

On the other side of the debate, silestone provides a highly resistant, engineered material made of natural quartz and binding resins. Quartz is the toughest material available on the market for building countertops. It is scratch and scorch proof, so the average kitchen accident will not harm the material. Nonetheless, you should be careful with excessive pressure and heat.

Silestone countertops have a nonporous texture, which makes them resistant to stains, as they do not absorb liquids. Therefore, you will have no problem in cleaning the accidental spill of wine or coffee. This texture also makes it extra safe, as it is difficult for pathogens to develop on its surface. Moreover, the National Sanitation Foundation and the Greenguard Environmental Institute have certified them as a low-emitting product, which makes it perfect for use in the kitchen.

Available Colors

Silestone also comes in a wide variety of colors and combinations. As it is man-made, you have the option to customize your countertops. There are beautiful natural looking white color patterns as well as wild looking green color patterns. Each manufaturer has a different selection. You may also be interested in exploring the colors from Cambria countertops.

It may be a hard choice to make and you should think long term when facing the quartz vs granite competition.

What Does Silestone Cost?

Silestone counters are rather affordable. Expect to pay about the same as what you would pay for quality granite. Prices start around $50 per linear foot and go up to more than twice that if you opt for the more expensive and rare color combinations.

Overall, when it comes to the silestone versus granite dilemma, the choice is yours. If you want a more traditional, unique look and you do not mind the occasional maintenance issues, you can go for granite. If you are looking for a modern look that ensures durability and safety, you should go for the silestone countertops.

{ 6 comments… read them below or add one }

JP November 14, 2012 at 5:21 pm

Just had Silestone installed in my kitchen. I love the island (Black Canyon) I hate the “wall” counters (Doradus). The black sample I got before buying looks black. The counters look “milky” almost grey. I am trying to resolve this with the installer and Cosentino, but both claim since it has natural materials, there will be some color variation. They make excuses instead of fixing the problem. I should have saved myself time, aggravation and $30 a sq foot and gone with a black granite instead of the Doradus. If you like Quartz, my advice would be to stay away from blacks and more “solid” colors. Get something busy.

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Peter Liang November 14, 2012 at 6:19 pm

Sorry to hear you had trouble. I think it’s crappy that the sample didn’t match the countertop.

Just like with a car, solid blacks can be trouble as they get a hazed look to them and soap scum shows up easy. You’ve got to work harder to make them shine. While that’s not part of your problem it’s another thing to consider when thinking about black.

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HB May 18, 2013 at 9:52 am

Is quarter-cove trim available in Silestone or any of the other quartz products? I want a radiused transition between the counter-top and the wall, rather than a 90-degree angle, to make it easier to keep the area behind the cook-top clean and grease-free.

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Peter Liang May 18, 2013 at 5:39 pm

Hi HB,

I have never seen anything like that before. You might be able to get something made custom. I don’t know. Check with a couple of your local fabricators.

I’ve never had a problem with my countertops with a 90 degree angle at the backsplash. That is an interesting look you are creating there. I kinda like it.

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Kasey T. June 22, 2013 at 1:58 pm

I have two 45 degree angles on my kitchen silestone countertop. The counter is 7 years old and the seams are opening just slightly. If I remember correctly, they filled these seems with colored caulk, but it is time to re-fill. Is that something I can do as a DIY-er and can I buy it a t my local big box home improvement store? Thanks for your help!

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Peter Liang July 19, 2013 at 2:09 pm

Absolutely Kasey. You should have no problem doing that. I would check with a dealer however to see which caulk they recommend. They’ll probably be able to sell you a tube on the spot.

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